Sunday, July 5, 2020

Stefano Gross, great technical skier.


World Cup skiers are the best skiers in the world, why? They have to be the most efficient, most refined, and the fastest through a turn. The weeding out process involves thousands from every skiing nation. It takes years and only the very best reach the top ranks. This isn't a beauty contest but the movements are beautiful.

Stefano Gross show that by flexing and bending his legs to retract his skis from the snow is the most efficient way to change from one turn to the next.
 Stefano Gross shows that by flexing and bending his legs to retract his skis from the snow results in the most efficient way to change from one turn to the next. This is called the edge change or a transition.



Once the retraction begins the feet can be pulled back and held back. This allows the CG (center of gravity) to move forward and down to take a shorter line to the next arc.




Using this technique creates the best method of re-centering. Old school ski instruction and coaching still applies the idea of moving the hips forward by leg extension. That method is obsolete, slow, and will never advance your skiing. 




In this photo, you see the path of the skis and the shorter distance the hip takes to the gate. This technique allows the hips to catch up and to re-center over the skis, without any extension.  The yellow arrow is the key to the success story all top world cup racers use, it's the "Foot pullback". Pulling the feet back lets the hips move down and slightly forward until the skis are directly pointing downhill. At the falline or Apex of the turn, his hips will be forward and his boots under and behind his hips. Without this relationship, the tips of the skis will not carve properly or be able to cut sharply under the gate.





2 comments:

Crawford Pierce said...

Harald - Great little article and pictures to demonstrate the movements. Arrows are a great addition. Such a simple concept, however, as I've said before: " they got two good eyes, but they still can't see ..." CRP

Harald Harb said...

Thanks, Crawford