Saturday, March 24, 2018

2nd in the "Skiing System Comparison". Transitions.

           The Transition comes from a great Release! 


For many skiers, this is where the trouble begins the way the release is structured. However, when the transition is approached with "certain movements", success and balance are achieved. Here again, we will compare between a PSIA Demo Team skier and a PMTS demonstrator.

(below photo The PMTS skier flexes and retracts the stance leg, and while doing so lifts the ski tip to free the leg and ski from the snow. This allows a transition movement.  This movement also changes the balance from the previous outside ski on the big toe edge to the new stance ski on the little toe edge. Now the free ski can begin tipping before the new stance ski. This creates a transition with parallel skis and parallel leg shafts.

Here is the result of this transition, a balanced stance on the new outside ski and a transition where the little toe edge is tipping and the big toe edge ski is already engaged, high in the arc and before the falline.




In contrast, we see the PSIA method where the uphill ski is flat and the tail of the ski is pushed uphill as in a Wedge Christie. Also, there is no energy from the previous stance ski to help transition or releasing due to the squaring of the hips. There is no evident balance transfer to the new ski from these movements. The skier is virtually stuck between his skis.


In the next frame below, we see the big toe edge engagement at the top of the arc, and no angles with the body going to the downhill side of both skis. Notice the knees are together and feet apart, demonstrating no balance is created for the new turn on the new ski, yet. There is also no little toe edge tipping to establish angles at the top of the arc.

This methodology is a result of the leg steering principles held so dearly by the PSIA system.
 In contrast, the PMTS System uses no leg steering, instead preferring to get the skis on an angle by tipping the feet and counteracting the hips and using the arms, hands, and torso as the external cues for this to be accomplished.
.

In the photo below (PMTS System) it's obvious what the two different systems produce. These are not happenstance or anomalies, the photos you see here in comparison are based on movement differences taught by two separate and totally different teaching systems. 
Below we see the PMTS method with the free foot tipping toward the new little toe edge, before either ski changes direction.

The result here is very obvious,  early angles, balance and both skis parallel on their
 new edges for the arc.


When you get the hang of PMTS there is no stopping you. (below photo) These are the movements used by world cup skiers. Notice that below is a complete edge and body change from one side to the other,  without a direction change of the skis, that is an expert skier using the best movements.

4 comments:

freddmann said...

Thank you very much for your postings, particularly your recent transitions posts. PMTS has resulted in my completely changing my technique. I finally got the high part of the high-C turn. the skis have plenty of time to change edges, come moguls, crud, junk, or whatever, and the edge angles come easy and high. and the higher the high part of high-C, the easier it is to ski deep snow including NW crud.
In addition, Reilly McGlahan's youtube videos are a great help too.

Pierre PIGATI said...

Hi Harald,
You spend a lot of time comparing the PMTS to the PSIA system. All the essentials of the PMTS are perfectly logical and very well explained. In addition, PMTS works much better than PSIA in all essentials. Do you know why the so-called PSIA experts do not recognize this obvious situation?

Pierre PIGATI said...

Hi Harald,
You spend a lot of time comparing the PMTS to the PSIA system. All the essentials of the PMTS are perfectly logical and very well explained. In addition, PMTS works much better than PSIA in all essentials. Do you know why the so-called PSIA experts do not admit this obvious situation?

Harald Harb said...

Pierre, unfortunately, PSIA is not interested in producing efficient teaching methods or movement understanding. Their model is built on a paying membership organization. They make money from their membership, which includes training fees, certification and selling long underwear at reduced prices to ski instructors. PSIA doesn't make money from ski lessons. They are not vested in the end result, quality ski instruction for the consumer. My goal is to keep skiers informed as to better methods, I don't compete with PSIA, I offer a totally different system of ski instruction for the most dedicated skiers and instructors, that includes everything from boot set up to world-class movements from our camps. PSIA does none of this, so we are not in competition.