Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Basic Cuff Alignment

For some reason cuff alignment has gone nuts. Years ago the basic most rudimentary understanding was put the leg in the middle of both sides of the top cuff of the boot. 

The "left"  boot would normally be considered close to what you want to begin with. The footbeds should be in the boot, to stand on. When the cuff is touching the leg or pushing against the inside of the legs also called the medial side, that is called "cuff strong" or over powered.  The problem with over powering the leg with the cuff, is it pre-loads the big toe edge or inside edge of the ski, even in a straight run. If you try this from a straight run, both skis flat, and lift one foot/boot/ or ski off the snow; the ski immediately rails or you fall to the outside. So to balance and stay in a straight run on one leg, you have to push your leg, rotate the femur, inward which looks like you are pushing the knee against the over strong cuff or in toward the other leg. In fact that is exactly what happens. This makes the ski rail. and the upper body has to compensate as a result.

7 comments:

J Harman said...

From your experience, what boot has the most efficient and effective cuff alignment adjustment mechanism?

Harald Harb said...

The Head boots have a very good system of cuff adjustment on both sides of each boot. Sometimes in extreme cases even that doesn't go far enough. We are manufacturing our own adjustment rivets for those cases. It's really obvious in kids boots where there is little or no adjustability.

Antonio Di Carlo said...

How do you use the dual side adjustment? Is its purpose simply to increase the adjustability range or is there more than that?

Antonio Di Carlo said...

Just to clarify, I take from your description that "cuff strong" is the OPPOSITE situation than that depicted above for the right boot.. Or am I wrong?

Scott J said...

Great blog! What kids boots have the greatest cuff adjustability?

Harald Harb said...

Antonio, you are correct. With kids boots you have to look at each company individually to see what kind of cuff canting is available. The higher the flex rating and more stiff the boots get, say from 70 flex to 90 flex, that's where the boot companies start to add cuff canting. Usually only on one side. We have designed and manufactured inserts for some models of boots so that we can get cuff canting. This is a real problem for many kids, the cuffs are too strong against their legs.

buzzworm said...

Hi Harald, I've been loving your material for a long time. I've been struggling with this issue myself for years, since my tibia bow out quite a bit.

Years ago I bought a pair of Dalbello Vario SGS boots with adjustable sole canting angle, but they weight 8.5 lbs each, plus I'm trying to get into touring, so I'm looking for another solution.

A bootfitter had me stand in my Scarpa Maestrale RS boot shells with the cuff adjustment maxed out and said I needed to have canting shims mounted under my touring bindings, but I've run into roadblocks with that approach too.

You mentioned that HEAD boots have a great cuff angle adjustment system, and that you're going to manufacture custom bolts for greater range. Did you end up doing this, and are they only for HEAD boots? I'm trying to see if this would be a viable option.

Thanks!